Campus Safari Chapter 12 09
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  1. Vorlonagent

    Mars’ surface gravity is 38% of earth’s. It would be a neat trick to get it up to a full G.

    And give mars a new magnetic field to replace the one it lost when its core cooled and solidified.

    And if they could do that, they might be able to spin Mars up to where its day that matches Earth’s.

    …which would scare the heck out of every earthling who knows what doing those things would take and how easily a civilization capable of such things could swat Earth like a fly.

    • The day length doesn’t matter. Humans would simply maintain their schedule, or close to it.

      The gravity thing I’m not sure how big an issue it is. On it’s own, may not matter.

      The magnetic field does matter though as you’ll need some way to mitigate the radiation coming in.

      Even doing that much would be nerve wracking for many considering we can barely make it to Mars and get back right now. And even that is in doubt.

      • Iron Ed

        Doesn’t gravity have something to do with keeping the atmosphere from floating off into space?

        • Hariman

          I think they’d need to import a moon at some point too, as I’ve heard about the moon skimming some of the atmosphere off of Earth being beneficial to maintaining a balance of/for life.

        • Yes gravity is important for retaining atmosphere but raising Mars to an earth-level density atmosphere would provide an atmosphere that would take millions of years to dissipate if not far longer. Odds are without extreme effort no sentient life would be left to care by that point anyway, if there were more than likely the tech would remain to replenish the atmosphere as needed.

        • Chakat Firepaw

          More important are the magnetosphere and the presence of an “ice trap”. Gravity helps, but the bigger issue is the solar wind pulling stuff off the top.

          A magnetosphere reduces the amount of solar wind impacting the atmosphere.

          An ice trap, (an altitude range where water freezes out and falls back into the lower atmosphere), keeps hydrogen and oxygen away from the solar wind that does get through.

      • TiffRoss

        Ok, so they need to ignite the core and manipulate the planet to spin just a little faster. 😀 As for the moon, I think they’re going to build a Death star. >:D

        • Iron Ed

          Kewl! 🙂 I have read scifi stories with moon-sized spaceships. I think even planet-sized.

          • Ever read the Troy trilogy? The guy built a death star, funded by the craziest of methods.

          • Check out the webcomic A Miracle Of Science, the Martians turned one of Mars’ moon into a giant space ship that they actually moved near the end of the strip to rescue one of its members.

    • Hariman

      Ancient super terraforming technology from the Rumuah precursors who created the Cyantians. (Tiff’s info, not my guess, from a similar question a while back.)

      Also, now I have the image of either Syrys or Quinn patting a earth diplomat on the head and telling them that it will be okay, they’re not the world swatting types, and then either laughing or giggling when the diplomat gets offended/huffy.

      Plus, I’m pretty sure that some of the governments DID notice that something was up with Mars, and that’s why the AMIB is so nervous/suspicious of the Cyantians.

  2. Talis Mahn

    Someone at NASA mentioned putting a magnetic shield at the Martian/sun L1 point to shield explorers from solar radiation

  3. Maryalee

    Gravity, over time, would be a big deal. Some of the problems with extended weightlessness is that astronauts lose bone density in zero-g, and muscles, including internal organs, begin to atrophy. The effect at <1g would not be as significant as full zero-g, but it would compound over time. So one of three things would have to happen for Mars to become a permanent settlement: 1) Strictly limit the amount of time any person spends on Mars at a time and rotate in and out; 2) They would need to raise the planet's gravity; 3) They would need to genetically engineer a human species that could thrive at the reduced gravity level. In order of progressive difficulty.

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Discussion (13) ¬

  1. Vorlonagent

    Mars’ surface gravity is 38% of earth’s. It would be a neat trick to get it up to a full G.

    And give mars a new magnetic field to replace the one it lost when its core cooled and solidified.

    And if they could do that, they might be able to spin Mars up to where its day that matches Earth’s.

    …which would scare the heck out of every earthling who knows what doing those things would take and how easily a civilization capable of such things could swat Earth like a fly.

    • The day length doesn’t matter. Humans would simply maintain their schedule, or close to it.

      The gravity thing I’m not sure how big an issue it is. On it’s own, may not matter.

      The magnetic field does matter though as you’ll need some way to mitigate the radiation coming in.

      Even doing that much would be nerve wracking for many considering we can barely make it to Mars and get back right now. And even that is in doubt.

      • Iron Ed

        Doesn’t gravity have something to do with keeping the atmosphere from floating off into space?

        • Hariman

          I think they’d need to import a moon at some point too, as I’ve heard about the moon skimming some of the atmosphere off of Earth being beneficial to maintaining a balance of/for life.

        • Yes gravity is important for retaining atmosphere but raising Mars to an earth-level density atmosphere would provide an atmosphere that would take millions of years to dissipate if not far longer. Odds are without extreme effort no sentient life would be left to care by that point anyway, if there were more than likely the tech would remain to replenish the atmosphere as needed.

        • Chakat Firepaw

          More important are the magnetosphere and the presence of an “ice trap”. Gravity helps, but the bigger issue is the solar wind pulling stuff off the top.

          A magnetosphere reduces the amount of solar wind impacting the atmosphere.

          An ice trap, (an altitude range where water freezes out and falls back into the lower atmosphere), keeps hydrogen and oxygen away from the solar wind that does get through.

      • TiffRoss

        Ok, so they need to ignite the core and manipulate the planet to spin just a little faster. 😀 As for the moon, I think they’re going to build a Death star. >:D

        • Iron Ed

          Kewl! 🙂 I have read scifi stories with moon-sized spaceships. I think even planet-sized.

          • Ever read the Troy trilogy? The guy built a death star, funded by the craziest of methods.

          • Check out the webcomic A Miracle Of Science, the Martians turned one of Mars’ moon into a giant space ship that they actually moved near the end of the strip to rescue one of its members.

    • Hariman

      Ancient super terraforming technology from the Rumuah precursors who created the Cyantians. (Tiff’s info, not my guess, from a similar question a while back.)

      Also, now I have the image of either Syrys or Quinn patting a earth diplomat on the head and telling them that it will be okay, they’re not the world swatting types, and then either laughing or giggling when the diplomat gets offended/huffy.

      Plus, I’m pretty sure that some of the governments DID notice that something was up with Mars, and that’s why the AMIB is so nervous/suspicious of the Cyantians.

  2. Talis Mahn

    Someone at NASA mentioned putting a magnetic shield at the Martian/sun L1 point to shield explorers from solar radiation

  3. Maryalee

    Gravity, over time, would be a big deal. Some of the problems with extended weightlessness is that astronauts lose bone density in zero-g, and muscles, including internal organs, begin to atrophy. The effect at <1g would not be as significant as full zero-g, but it would compound over time. So one of three things would have to happen for Mars to become a permanent settlement: 1) Strictly limit the amount of time any person spends on Mars at a time and rotate in and out; 2) They would need to raise the planet's gravity; 3) They would need to genetically engineer a human species that could thrive at the reduced gravity level. In order of progressive difficulty.

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CS-Chapter 12

11 comics.
Dec 6th, 2016

Jan 2nd, 2017

Jan 9th, 2017

Jan 16th, 2017

Jan 30th, 2017

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